The Visual Cultures of Classical Greece

Dimitris Plantzos

Description

Outline

This course offers a comprehensive account of ancient Greek art, from c. 1200 to c. 30 BC, with an emphasis on its content, interpretation, and cultural significance. Several key themes will be pursued throughout the course: human figure and its representation; Greek art in its religious and political settings; materials and techniques; pictorial themes; and so on. Besides the better-known monumental arts of ancient Greece (chiefly: architecture; sculpture; painting), and the ever-popular vase painting, the course will also cover some relatively neglected aspects of Greek art such as decorative or luxury arts and coinage. After a short introduction on the arts of the Late Bronze Age (c. 1600-1100 BC), the course will cover the art and archaeology of the Early Iron Age (c. 1100-700 BC), and that of the Archaic (c. 700-480 BC), Classical (. 480-336 BC) and Hellenistic periods (c. 336-30 BC).

Learning outcomes:

By the end of this course students should be familiar with

  • the main pr
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Course Syllabus

Fall 2020

Module: The Visual Cultures of Classical Greece

Mondays 10:00-12:00; Library Auditorium

Instructor: Prof. Dimitris Plantzos (dkplantzos@arch.uoa.gr)

Available: contact via skype [dkplantzos]

 

description/objectives

This course offers a comprehensive account of ancient Greek art, from c. 1200 to c. 30 BC, with an emphasis on its content, interpretation, and cultural significance. Several key themes will be pursued throughout the course: human figure and its representation; Greek art in its religious and political settings; materials and techniques; pictorial themes; and so on.

Besides the better-known monumental arts of ancient Greece (chiefly: architecture; sculpture; painting), and the ever-popular vase painting, the course will also cover some relatively neglected aspects of Greek art such as decorative or luxury arts and coinage. After a short introduction on the arts of the Late Bronze Age (c. 1600-1100 BC), the course will cover the art and archaeology of the Early Iron Age (c. 1100-700 BC), and that of the Archaic (c. 700-480 BC), Classical (. 480-336 BC) and Hellenistic periods (c. 336-30 BC).

Required text books

  • Plantzos, D. Greek Art and Archaeology, 1200-30 BC. Athens 2016.
  • Smith, T.J. and D. Plantzos (eds). A Companion to Greek Art. Malden MA 20128.

Additional literature

  • Beard, M. and J. Henderson. Classical Art. From Greece to Rome. Oxford 2001.
  • Biers, W.R. The Archaeology of Greece. Ithaca & London 1996.
  • Boardman, Greek Art. London & New York 2016.
  • Hurwit, J.M. The Art and Culture of Early Greece. Ithaka & London 1985.
  • Knigge, U. The Athenian Kerameikos. Athens 1991.
  • Neer, R.T. Greek Art and Archaeology: A New History, c. 2500-c. 150 BCE. London & New York 2011.
  • Osborne, R. Greece in the Making 1200 – 479 BC. London 1996.
  • Pomeroy, S.B., S.M. Burnstein, W. Donlan, and J.T. Roberts. A Brief History of Ancient Greece. Politics, Society and Culture. Oxford 2004.
  • Plantzos, D. The Art of Painting in Ancient Greece. Athens and Atlanta, GA 2018.
  • Robertson, M. A History of Greek Art. Cambridge 1975.
  • Whitley, J. The Archaeology of Ancient Greece. Cambridge 2001.

There are now a number of good scholarly websites with information on classical art:

  • Classical Art Research Centre, University of Oxford:
    http://www.beazley.ox.ac.uk/index.htm (databases, bibliography, images)
  • Perseus Digital Library, Tufts University USA:
    http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/ (Greek and Latin texts, figures, encyclopaedia of Classical sites)
  • Zenon, German Archaeological Institute:
    http://opac.dainst.org/ (bibliography)
  • AWOL: The Ancient World Online, British and French Schools in Athens:
    http://ancientworldonline.blogspot.com (archaeological news)
  • Stoa, Kentucky University USA:
    http://www.stoa.org/(images, texts)
  • Οδυσσεύς, Greek Ministry of Culture: http://odysseus.culture.gr/(Greek archaeological sites and museums)

 

Requirements

Students are required to attend all meetings. In case of illness, it is the student’s responsibility to contact the instructor and to make up for missed work. Attendance is taken at each session.

Some meetings will be held at museums and / or archaeological sites, which we can enter for free as a group. Be on time. Always bring your student ID.

Weather conditions may vary when on site, especially during late fall and winter, so be prepared for rain and wind. Always wear good walking shoes. Most monuments are accessible over rocky terrain which may be slippery or in other ways unpleasant to walk on. Walking on grass can also be unpleasant or even dangerous when barefoot.

Students are expected to take an active role by reading the assignments in advance, by participating in class discussions and by giving on-site presentations. During the course a written record should be kept, which includes notes on lectures, summaries and period plans.  

Assignments and grading

A midterm test (on material taught in classes 1-6) will be offered on Monday, November 9th. A successful midterm will count towards 20% of your final grade in this module.

The module will be assessed by a 3,500-5,000 word essay due on or before February 15, 2021. Essay topics will be decided in consultation with the instructor between weeks 8 and 10. Instructor feedback available until Jannuary 24 (cut-off date), after which essays will be marked on a no-feedback basis.

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